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    STUDIA BIOLOGIA - Issue no. 2 / 2004  
         
  Article:   SALT STRESS TOLERANCE OF A FRESHWATER GREEN ALGA UNDER DIFFERENT PHOTON FLUX DENSITIES.

Authors:  LASZLO FODORPATAKI, CSABA BARTHA.
 
       
         
  Abstract:  Salinity stress and unfavorable light conditions are main limiting factors of plant productivity both in aquatic and terrestrial, natural and anthropically modified environments. This is the reason why the identification of physiological responses to the interactive effects of high salt concentration and different photon flux densities is an important requirement for the selection of tolerant and highly productive plant ecotypes under stressful environmental conditions. The aim of this study is to identify physiological parameters which enable the evaluation of the degree of salt stress tolerance and the energetic requirements of protective mechanisms based on the photochemical conversion of light energy. The axenic monoalgal cultures of Scenedesmus opoliensis were grown under controlled conditions in the presence of 0, 0.1 and 0.5 M NaCl at photon flux densities of 5, 50 and 100 μM m-2s-1. The dynamics of growth and biomass production, as well as the photosynthetic pigment content was determined for all the experimental variants, the significance of the results was evaluated with the one-way ANOVA and with the Tukey test. The investigated freshwater microalga can easily acclimate to high salt concentrations, under these conditions the rate of cell divisions increases, the cells develop very small light-harvesting antennae and they excrete high amounts of mucilage in which the individuals form extended aggregates.  
         
     
         
         
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