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    STUDIA HISTORIA - Issue no. 3 / 2002  
         
  Article:   MEDIEVAL CHURCHES OF THE MENDICANT ORDERS FROM TRANSYLVANIA IN TERMS OF THEIR TYPOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT.

Authors:  MIHAELA SANDA SOLONTAI.
 
       
         
  Abstract:  Starting with the third decade of the 13th century, the presence of the new Catholic orders, initially represented by the Franciscans and the Dominicans , began to be felt in Central and Eastern Europe. Working from the very outset in the service of the Apostolic See, the Friars Preachers and the Friars Minor became the main agents of Catholic proselytism in these parts, and were later responsible with maintaining and strengthening the authority of the Roman Church in its dioceses. Both orders were practicing a new type of monastic life, radically different from the contemplative and recluse traditional cenobitism, with its daily activities strictly confined to ora et labora, and with the monks spending their entire lives within the walls of the same monastery. The new socio-economic context, generated by the apparition and the development of the urban centers, had a considerable impact upon cultural and spiritual life, and the Church was forced to reconsider its attitude with regard to a society now vulnerable to various forms of alienation from the Catholic doctrine, as shown by the numerous so-called heresies thriving in the urban environment. The establishment of the mendicant orders in the early 13th century comes in close connection to this phenomenon, being also related to the expansionist policy directed by the Holy See towards the northern and the eastern parts of Europe, and carried out with the help of the Franciscans and the Dominicans.  
         
     
         
         
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